Archive for the ‘NFL’ Category

TMQ Watch: January 27, 2015.

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

So. It has come to this.

(Actually, we just like saying “So. It has come to this.” We’re also fond of “As foretold in the prophecy” and “so let it be written, so let it be done”.)

This week’s TMQ, after the jump…

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TMQ Watch: January 20, 2015.

Wednesday, January 21st, 2015

We’re grumpy. Apparently, this is a day ending in “Y”. Let’s just jump right into this week’s TMQ

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TMQ Watch: January 13, 2015.

Thursday, January 15th, 2015

We lost the better part of the day yesterday to jury duty, so we’re late getting this up. We apologize for the convenience.

After the jump, this week’s TMQ

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Norts spews.

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

Well. Well well well. Well. Yes, I am happy about Ohio State winning; as my regular readers know, I have ties to the Ohio area.

Since I don’t have cable, I mostly followed the game on FARK until I dozed off after halftime (yesterday was a rough day at work). From what I can tell, it might be a good idea for Ohio State to spend some time in the off season working on HOLDING ON TO THE DAMN BALL!

I don’t have a lot to say about the John Fox “firing” right now, except that I think it will be interesting to see how things play out after the Superb Owl. I may have more to say once this week’s TMQ goes up.

Obit watch: Roy Tarpley, former center for the Dallas Mavericks. As my regular readers know, I’m not a basketball fan, but the Tarpley story is sad and worth noting:

He was suspended by the NBA after five games in the 1989-90 season after being arrested for driving while intoxicated and resisting arrest. In 1991, he drew another suspension after a second DWI arrest and, a few months later, had a third violation and was banned from the league for violating the NBA’s drug-use policies.
He returned to the Mavericks briefly in 1994 but then was permanently barred in December 1995 for violating terms of his aftercare program.

Obit watch: January 9, 2015.

Friday, January 9th, 2015

Jethro Pugh, former player for the Dallas Cowboys.

No. 75 became a fixture in the Cowboys’ defensive line, playing for 14 seasons, from 1965-78. Only three players had a longer run with the Cowboys than Pugh. The defensive tackle finished with 95.5 sacks for his career and led the team in that statistic for five consecutive seasons (’68-72) before it became an official category.

And yes, he did play in the Ice Bowl.

I missed this one, so I’ll direct you over to Lawrence for Lee Israel.

TMQ Watch: January 6, 2015.

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

Sex! Gambling! After the jump, this week’s TMQ

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TMQ Watch: December 30, 2014.

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

We hope everyone had a good Christmas – or, if you do not celebrate Christmas, a good version of whatever seasonal observance you do celebrate.

In this week’s TMQ, the purge.

No, not that one (though we commend to your attention the “The Purge” episode of “Phil and Lisa Ruin the Movies”), but the annual NFL coaching purge, or as we call it, “Bloody Monday”. After the jump…

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More blood for the blood god!

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

The hapless Jacksonville Jaguars have fired offensive coordinator Jedd Fisch.

In other news, am I allowed to laugh maniacally at the idea of Gary Kubiak coaching the Jets?

Bloody Monday.

Monday, December 29th, 2014

This is your official NFL firings thread, which will be updated through the day as more people get the axe.

Jim Harbaugh was well reported yesterday (I was out and about). Technically, they’re making noises like it wasn’t a firing, but I still count it as one.

Rex Ryan and John Idzik (the general manager) are confirmed out at the Jets. No great shock.

Mike Smith is out at Atlanta: the press conference is at 11 AM Eastern, but ESPN has the press release.

Marc Trestman and Phil Emery (the general manager) are both out in Chicago, according to “sources”.

TMQ Watch: December 23, 2014.

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

Before we jump into this week’s post-bye TMQ, a tweet from Easterbrook:

Dear Greggles:

The “whole nation” saw Jacksonville – Tennessee because it was a Thursday night game and the only game on. It may be true that California didn’t get to see Dallas – Indianapolis, but that was a curb stomping; the San Diego – San Francisco and Oakland – Buffalo games were close thrillers.

After the jump, this week’s TMQ. Warning: spoilers ahead for “Ascension”.

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TMQ Watch: December 16, 2014.

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

Since we are seeing some activity, mostly around older TMQ Watch items, we thought we’d throw up a general reminder (along with the sash): TMQ is taking a bye this week, and will be back next week.

Obit watch: December 16, 2014.

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

Fred “Fuzzy” Thurston, former Green Bay Packer.

Lombardi, the Hall of Fame coach, led the Packers for nine seasons, and Thurston was there for every one of them. The pre-eminent team of the 1960s, the Packers won championships in 1961, 1962, 1965, 1966 and 1967, including the first two Super Bowls, and though much of the team’s success was built on a ferocious defense, some of the game’s great players — including quarterback Bart Starr, halfback Paul Hornung and fullback Jim Taylor, all Hall of Famers — made Green Bay a powerful offensive force as well.

Thurston was a key element in Green Bay’s implementation of the sweep:

In the sweep, sometimes called the Lombardi sweep for the coach’s fine-tuning of a play that originated in an earlier football era, the two guards are required to pull. That is, instead of pushing forward against the defensive players lined up in front of them, they race in tandem along the line of scrimmage toward one sideline or the other before surging upfield, one ideally blocking a linebacker and the other a defensive back, providing an avenue for the runner behind them.
With Hornung and Taylor carrying the ball behind Thurston and Kramer, the Packer sweep was close to unstoppable, even though opponents often knew it was coming. Generally speaking, guards are among the most anonymous players on the field, but the Green Bay sweep was iconic enough that Thurston and Kramer became well known to football fans.